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POMDPSolve

A Julia wrapper for pomdp-solve that interfaces with the POMDPs.jl framework

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POMDP-Solve

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This is a Julia wrapper for the POMDP-Solve program, orginally developed at Brown University that uses the POMDPs.jl interface. This package uses the code available from Tony Cassandra's pomdp.org page.

The pomdp-solve program solves partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs), taking a model specification and producing a value function and action policy. It employs many different algorithms, some exact and some approximate.

Git It:

After installing POMDPs.jl run the following commands in the Julia REPL:

using POMDPs
POMDPs.add("POMDPSolve")

Usage:

solver = POMDPSolveSolver()
solve(solver, pomdp) # returns an AlphaVectorPolicy

Parameters:

The following parameters come from http://www.pomdp.org/code/cmd-line.html:

stdout <filename>
	type    = AbstractString
    units   = filename
    default = STDOUT

The pomdp-solve program displays much status and progress information to stdout. If you want to have this redirected to a file instead, provide the file name as this parameter. Not specifying this option will simply make this information go to normal STDOUT.

rand_seed <seed1:seed2:seed3>
	type    = Tuple{Int,Int,Int}
    default = init via system time

For any functionality that requires random numbers, we want to be able to reproduce a given run by executing with the same random number seed. This parameter allows you to set the initial random seed by specifying a string consisting of three integers separated by a colon (e.g., "34523:12987:50732" ) Not setting this value will result in the random seed being pseudo-randomized based on the system clock.

stat_summary <flag>
	type    = Bool
    default = false

The pomdp-solve program is capable of keeping various statistical information as it solves the problem. If you want to track these stats and print them, set this flag to true.

memory_limit <limit>
	type    = Int
    units   = bytes
    valid   = 1:typemax(Int)
    default = Inf

This parameter allows you to set an upper bound on the amount of memory that this program uses. If the memory threshold is met, the program execution is terminated. Without specifying this parameter, there will be no upper bound imposed by the pomdp-solve program (though the OS will naturally have something to say about this).

time_limit <limit>
	type    = Int
    units   = seconds
    valid   = 1:typemax(Int)
    default = Inf

This parameter allows you to set an upper bound on the amount of time that this program will run. When this amount of time has elapsed, the program execution is terminated. Without specifying this parameter, there will be no upper bound imposed by the pomdp-solve program.

terminal_values <initial_policy_filename>
	type    = AbstractString
    units   = filename

Value iteration assumes that at the end of the lifetime of the decision maker that no more values will be accrued. This corresponds to a terminal value function of all zeroes. This is essentially the default starting point for the program. However, with this parameter, you can set a different terminal value function, which serves as the seed or initial starting point for value iteration. Effectively, this allows you to take the output of one value iteration run and send it as input to the next. The file format for this input file is identical to the output file format of this program (the ".alpha" file).

horizon <value>
	type    = Int
    units   = iteration
    valid   = 1:typemax(Int)
    default = run until convergence

Value iteration is iterative and thus we may want to find 'finite horizon' solutions for various reasons. To make pomdp-solve terminate after a fixed number of iterations (aka epochs) set this value to be some positive number. By default, value iteration will run for as many iterations as it take to 'converge' on the infinite horizon solution.

discount <value>
	type    = Float64
    valid   = (0:1)
    default = -1

This sets the discount factor to use during value iteration which dictates the relative usefulness of future rewards compared to immediate rewards.

stop_criteria <value>
	type    = Symbol
    valid   = {:exact, :weak, :bellman}
    default = :weak

At the end of each epoch of value iteration, a check is done to see whether the solutions have 'converged' to the (near) optimal infinite horizon solution. there are more than one way to determine this stopping condition. The exact semantics of each are not described here at this time.

stop_delta <value>
	type    = Float64
    valid   = 0:Inf
    default = 1e-9

When checking the stopping criteria at the end of each value iteration epoch, some of the stopping condition types use a tolerance/precision in their calculations. This parameter allows you to set that precision.

save_all <flag>
	type    = Bool
    default = false

Normally, only the final solution is saved to a file, but if you would like to write out the solution to every epoch of value iteration, then set this flag to true. The epoch number will be appened to the filenames that are output.

vi_variation <flag>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:normal, :zlz, :adjustable_epsilon, :fixed_soln_size}
    default = :normal

Independent of particular algortihms for computing one iteration of value iteration are a number of variations of value iteration meant to help speed up convergence. We do not yet attempt to give a full description of the semantics of each here.

start_epsilon <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}

When solving using the 'adjustable_epsilon' method of value iteration, we need to specify both a staring and ending precision. This is the starting precision.

end_epsilon <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}

When solving using the 'adjustable_epsilon' method of value iteration, we need to specify both a staring and ending precision. This is the ending precision.

epsilon_adjust <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}

When solving using the 'adjustable_epsilon' method of value iteration, we need to specify a staring and ending precision as well as the increment to use for each adjustment. This is the precision increment.

max_soln_size <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}

When solving using the 'fixed_soln_size' method we need to define what the maximal size of a soltuion we will tolerate. This sets that limit.

history_length <value>
	type    = Int
	units   = epochs
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}

When using the 'adjustable_epsilon' value iteration variant, we need to compare solution sizes from the the rpevious epochs to see whethere or not the solutions are staying relatively constant in size. To do this, we need to define a past window length, as well as a tolerance on how much variation in solution size we want to care about. This parameter defines the length of the epoch window history to use when determining whether it is time to adjust the precision of the value iteration solution.

history_delta <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}

When using the 'adjustable_epsilon' value iteration variant, we need to compare solution sizes from the the previous epochs to see whether or not the solutions are staying relatively constant in size. To do this, we need to define a past window length, as well as a tolerance on how much variation in solution size we want to care about. This parameter defines the tolerance on what we will consider all solutions to be of the same size.

dom_check <flag>
	type    = Bool
	default = true

There is a computationally simple, but not precision domination check that can be done to discover useless components of a value function. This is often useful, but there are circumstances in which it is best to turn this off.

prune_epsilon <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}
	default = 1e-9

There are a number of ways to prune sets of value function components. Each uses a precision actor which is this parameter.

epsilon <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}
	default = 1e-9

This is the main precision setting parameter which will effect the preciseness for the solution procedures.

lp_epsilon <value>
	type    = Float64
	valid   = 0:typemax{Float64}
	default = 1e-9

Many solution procedures employ linear programming in their algorithms. For those that do, thisk is the precision level used inside the linear programming routines.

proj_purge <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:none, :domonly, :normal_prune, :epsilon_prune}
	default = :normal_prune

The first step for most algorithms is to compute the forward projection of the previous iteration solution components. Combinations of these will comprise the current solution. Prior to emplying any algorithm to find which combinations are needed (the heart of the POMDP solution algorithms) we can employ a process of pruning the projected set, often reducing the complexity of the algorithms. This parameter decides what type of pruning to use at this step. Details on the semantics of each type of pruning are not yet given here.

q_purge <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:none, :domonly, :normal_prune, :epsilon_prune}
	default = :normal_prune

Some algorithms will separately solve the problem for individual actions, then merge these results together. The individual action solutions are referred to as the "Q-functions". After merging, some pruning process will likely take place, but we can also choose to do a pre-merge pruning of these sets which often simplifies the merging process. This parameter defines the method to use for this pre-merge pruning.

witness_points <flag>
	type    = Bool
	default = false

Keeping 'witness points' means to track individual points that have been found that gave rise to individual value function components. These can often be used to help speed up the solution process.

alg_rand <valid>
	type    = Int
	units   = points
	valid   = 0:typemax{Int}

One can speed up the discovery of the initial shape of the value function by randomly generating points and finding the value function components needed for those points. This technique is used if this parameter has a non-zero value.

prune_rand <valid>
	type    = Int
	units   = points
	valid   = 0:typemax{Int}

When pruning sets of value function components, we can use a random set of points to help speed up the pruning process. This parameter, if specified and non-zero, will define the number of random points to use in this way.

method <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:enum, :twopass, :linsup, :witness, :incprune, :grid, :mcgs}
	default = :incprune

The pomdp-solve program implements a number of differnt algorithms. This selects the one that should be used. Details of each method not yet provided here.

enum_purge <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:none, :domonly, :normal_prune, :epsilon_prune}
	default = :normal_prune

When using the enumeration method, there will be times where the set of value function components will need to be pruned or purged of useless components. This define the pruning method to use for this algorithm.

inc_prune <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:normal, :restricted_region, :generalized}
	default = :normal

The incremental pruning algorithm has a number of variations. This parameter selects the variation. We do not yet discuss here the nuances of these variations.

fg_type <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:simplex, :pairwise, :search, :initial}
	default = :initial

The finite grid method needs a set of belief points to compute over. There are a number of ways to generate this grid, and this parameter selects the technique to use. We do not yet here discuss the details of each of these.

fg_points <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}
	default = 10000

The finite grid method needs a set of belief points to compute over. There are a number of ways to generate this grid, and this parameter selects the maximum number of points that should be generated during this process.

fg_save <flag>
	type    = Bool
	default = false

The finite grid method needs a set of belief points to compute over. This parameter will turn on and off the saving of these belief points to an external file.

mcgs_traj_length <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}
	default = 100

The Monte-Carlo, Gauss-Seidel method using trajectories through the belief space to lay down a grid of points that we will compute the optimal value funciton for. This parameter defines the lengths of the trajectories.

mcgs_num_traj <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}
	default = 1000

The Monte-Carlo, Gauss-Seidel method use trajectories through the belief space to lay down a grid of points that we will compute the optimal value funciton for. This parameter defines the number of trajectories to use.

mcgs_traj_iter_count <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}
	default = 100

The Monte-Carlo, Gauss-Seidel method using trajectories through the belief space to lay down a grid of points that we will compute the optimal value funciton for. This parameter defines the number of value function update iterations to use on a given set of trajectories.

mcgs_prune_freq <value>
	type    = Int
	valid   = 1:typemax{Int}
	default = 100

The Monte-Carlo, Gauss-Seidel method using trajectories through the belief space to lay down a grid of points that we will compute the optimal value funciton for. This parameter defines how frequently we should prune the set of newly created value function facets during the generation of the value function points.

fg_purge <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:none, :domonly, :normal_prune, :epsilon_prune}
	default = :normal_prune

Defines the technique to use during pruning when the finite grid method is being used.

verbose <value>
	type    = Symbol
	valid   = {:context, :lp, :global, :timing, :stats, :cmdline, :main, :alpha, :proj, :crosssum, :agenda, :enum, :twopass, :linsup, :witness, :incprune, :lpinterface, :vertexenum, :mdp, :pomdp, :param, :parsimonious, :region, :approx_mcgs, :zlz_speedup, :finite_grid, :mcgs}

Each main module of pomdp-solve can be separately controlled as far as extra debugging output is concerned. This option can be used more than once to turn on debugging in more than one module. This input is technically repeatable in pomdp-solve.

License

POMDPSolve.jl uses Tony Cassandra's pomdp-solve library.

pompd-solve library uses the following external libraries, which have their own licenses:

  • lp_solve Which has an unclear license (this is an older version for which the source is no longer available).
  • laspack Which uses a custom license.

First Commit

12/13/2015

Last Touched

about 1 month ago

Commits

75 commits

Used By: