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Phylo

Simple phylogenetic trees in Julia to work with Diversity.jl - https://github.com/richardreeve/Diversity.jl

Readme

Phylo

Package for creating and manipulating phylogenies

Documentation PackageEvaluator Build Status of master
Works with 1.0!

Installation

The package is registered in METADATA on Julia v0.6 and the General registry on v0.7 and v1.0 and so can be installed with add. For example on Julia v1.0:

(v1.0) pkg> add Phylo
 Resolving package versions...
  Updating `~/.julia/environments/v1.0/Project.toml`
  [aea672f4] + Phylo v0.3.2
  Updating `~/.julia/environments/v1.0/Manifest.toml`
  [7d9fca2a] + Arpack v0.2.2
  [9e28174c] + BinDeps v0.8.9
  [31c24e10] + Distributions v0.16.2
  [90014a1f] + PDMats v0.9.4
  [aea672f4] + Phylo v0.3.2
  [1fd47b50] + QuadGK v2.0.0
  [79098fc4] + Rmath v0.5.0
  [276daf66] + SpecialFunctions v0.7.0
  [4c63d2b9] + StatsFuns v0.7.0
  [0796e94c] + Tokenize v0.5.2
  [30578b45] + URIParser v0.4.0
  [4607b0f0] + SuiteSparse

(v1.0) pkg>

Note some features are currently broken on the binary release of Julia v1.0.3 for linux. Unfortunately, this appears to be a bug in the Julia release. The current workarounds are to remain on Julia v1.0.2 or to use the Julia v1.1.0-rc1 release candidate.

Project Status

The package is tested against the current Julia v1.0 release, but also the previous v0.6 and v0.7 versions on Linux, macOS, and Windows.

Contributing and Questions

Contributions are very welcome, as are feature requests and suggestions. Please open an issue if you encounter any problems or would just like to ask a question.

Summary

Phylo is a Julia package that provides functionality for generating phylogenetic trees to feed into our Diversity package to calculate phylogenetic diversity. Phylo is currently in alpha, and is missing much functionality that people may desire, so please raise an issue if/when you find problems or missing functionality - don't assume that I know! Currently the package can be used to make trees manually, to generate random trees using the framework from Distributions, and to read newick and nexus format trees from files. For instance, to construct a sampler for 5 tip non-ultrametric trees, and then generate one or two random tree of that type (the examples below are from the master branch, but work similarly on the current release):

julia> using Phylo

julia> nu = Nonultrametric(5);

julia> tree = rand(nu)
PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 5 tips, 9 nodes and 8 branches.
Leaf names are tip 1, tip 2, tip 3, tip 4 and tip 5


julia> trees = rand(nu, ["Tree 1", "Tree 2"])
TreeSet with 2 trees, each with 5 tips.
Tree names are Tree 2 and Tree 1

Tree 2: PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 5 tips, 9 nodes and 8 branches.
Leaf names are tip 1, tip 2, tip 3, tip 4 and tip 5

Tree 1: PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 5 tips, 9 nodes and 8 branches.
Leaf names are tip 1, tip 2, tip 3, tip 4 and tip 5

The code also provides iterators, and filtered iterators over the branches, nodes, branchnames and nodenames of a tree, though this may soon be superseded by a simpler strategy.

julia> collect(nodeiter(tree))
9-element Array{Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}},1}:
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("tip 1", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(7, "Node 4", "tip 1", 1.1281538707050067), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("tip 2", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(1, "Node 1", "tip 2", 1.4283209045962866), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("tip 3", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(4, "Node 2", "tip 3", 0.6551342237894014), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("tip 4", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(2, "Node 1", "tip 4", 0.0029623552238387534), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("tip 5", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(3, "Node 2", "tip 5", 0.25029135145968845), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("Node 1", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(5, "Node 3", "Node 1", 0.3763450182758717), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[Branch{ManyRoots,String}(1, "Node 1", "tip 2", 1.42832), Branch{ManyRoots,String}(2, "Node 1", "tip 4", 0.00296236)])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("Node 2", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(6, "Node 3", "Node 2", 0.20796611994615047), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[Branch{ManyRoots,String}(3, "Node 2", "tip 5", 0.250291), Branch{ManyRoots,String}(4, "Node 2", "tip 3", 0.655134)])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("Node 3", Branch{ManyRoots,String}(8, "Node 4", "Node 3", 3.5927792827310996), Branch{ManyRoots,String}[Branch{ManyRoots,String}(5, "Node 3", "Node 1", 0.376345), Branch{ManyRoots,String}(6, "Node 3", "Node 2", 0.207966)])
 Node{ManyRoots,String,Branch{ManyRoots,String}}("Node 4", nothing, Branch{ManyRoots,String}[Branch{ManyRoots,String}(7, "Node 4", "tip 1", 1.12815), Branch{ManyRoots,String}(8, "Node 4", "Node 3", 3.59278)])

julia> collect(nodenamefilter(isroot, tree))
1-element Array{String,1}:
 "Node 4"

The current main purpose of this package is to provide a framework for phylogenetics to use in our Diversity package, and they will both be adapted as appropriate until both are functioning as required (though they are currently working together reasonably successfully).

It can also read newick trees either from strings or files:

julia> using Phylo

julia> simpletree = parsenewick("((,Tip:1.0)Internal,)Root;")
PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 3 tips, 5 nodes and 4 branches.
Leaf names are Node 1, Tip and Node 2


julia> getbranches(simpletree)
Base.ValueIterator for a Dict{Int64,Branch{ManyRoots,String}} with 4 entries. Values:
  Branch{ManyRoots,String}("Root", "Node 2", NaN)
  Branch{ManyRoots,String}("Internal", "Node 1", NaN)
  Branch{ManyRoots,String}("Root", "Internal", NaN)
  Branch{ManyRoots,String}("Internal", "Tip", 1.0)

julia> tree = open(parsenewick, Phylo.path("H1N1.newick"))
PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 507 tips, 1013 nodes and 1012 branches.
Leaf names are 44, 429, 294, 295, 227, ... [501 omitted] ... and 418

And it can read nexus trees from files too:

julia> ts = open(parsenexus, Phylo.path("H1N1.trees"))
[ Info: Created a tree called 'TREE1'
[ Info: Created a tree called 'TREE2'
TreeSet with 2 trees, each with 507 tips.
Tree names are TREE2 and TREE1

TREE2: PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 507 tips, 1013 nodes and 1012 branches.
Leaf names are H1N1_A_MIYAGI_3_2000, H1N1_A_PARMA_6_2008, H1N1_A_AKITA_86_2002, H1N1_A_DAKAR_14_1997, H1N1_A_EGYPT_84_2001, ... [501 omitted] ... and H1N1_A_HONGKONG_2070_1999

TREE1: PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 507 tips, 1013 nodes and 1012 branches.
Leaf names are H1N1_A_MIYAGI_3_2000, H1N1_A_PARMA_6_2008, H1N1_A_AKITA_86_2002, H1N1_A_DAKAR_14_1997, H1N1_A_EGYPT_84_2001, ... [501 omitted] ... and H1N1_A_HONGKONG_2070_1999

julia> ts["TREE1"]
PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 507 tips, 1013 nodes and 1012 branches.
Leaf names are H1N1_A_MIYAGI_3_2000, H1N1_A_PARMA_6_2008, H1N1_A_AKITA_86_2002, H1N1_A_DAKAR_14_1997, H1N1_A_EGYPT_84_2001, ... [501 omitted] ... and H1N1_A_HONGKONG_2070_1999

julia> gettreeinfo(ts)
Dict{String,Dict{String,Any}} with 2 entries:
  "TREE2" => Dict{String,Any}("lnP"=>-1.0)
  "TREE1" => Dict{String,Any}("lnP"=>1.0)

julia> gettreeinfo(ts, "TREE1")
Dict{String,Any} with 1 entry:
  "lnP" => 1.0

And while we wait for me (or kind contributors!) to fill out the other extensive functionality that many phylogenetics packages have in other languages, the other important feature that it offers is a fully(?)-functional interface to R, allowing any existing R library functions to be carried out on julia trees, and trees to be read from disk and written using R helper functions. Naturally the medium-term plan is to fill in as many of these gaps as possible in Julia, so the R interface does not make RCall a dependency of the package (we use the Requires package to avoid dependencies). Instead, if you want to use the R interface you just need to use both packages:

julia> using Phylo

julia> using RCall
Creating Phylo RCall interface...

R> library(ape)

You can then translate back and forth using rcopy on R phylo objects, and RObject constructors on julia NamedTree types to keep them in Julia or @rput to move the object into R:

julia> rt = rcall(:rtree, 10)
RObject{VecSxp}

Phylogenetic tree with 10 tips and 9 internal nodes.

Tip labels:
    t3, t5, t8, t1, t10, t9, ...

Rooted; includes branch lengths.


julia> jt = rcopy(NamedTree, rt)
PolytomousTree{ManyRoots,DataFrames.DataFrame,Dict{String,Any}} with 10 tips, 19 nodes and 18 branches.
Leaf names are t3, t5, t8, t1, t10, ... [4 omitted] ... and t7

julia> rjt = RObject(jt); # manually translate it back to R

R> all.equal($rjt, $rt)
[1] TRUE

julia> @rput rt; # Or use macros to pass R object back to R

julia> @rput jt; # And automatically translate jt back to R

R> jt

Phylogenetic tree with 10 tips and 9 internal nodes.

Tip labels:
    t3, t5, t8, t1, t10, t9, ...

Rooted; includes branch lengths.

R> all.equal(rt, jt) # check no damage in translations
[1] TRUE

For the time being the code will only work with rooted trees with named tips and branch lengths. If there's demand for other types of trees, I'll look into it.

First Commit

06/05/2017

Last Touched

1 day ago

Commits

366 commits

Used By: