dummy-link

QPSParser

Julia package for parsing QPS files.

Readme

QPSParser

Unix Windows Coveralls Codecov

Julia package for parsing QPS files.

Description

QPS is a file format, which is proposed by Maros and Mészáros, used to encode convex quadratic programming problems in plain text files. It is an extension to the well-known MPS format. The authors also provide a set of large and/or ill-conditioned QP test problems on their website to be used to assess the performance of different solvers.

QPSParser is a Julia package that aims at helping users parse problems written in the QPS file format.

Basic Usage

After installing the package via Pkg.add("QPSParser"), we import the useful parts of the package to our workspace by using QPSParser.

Parsing QPS files

To parse a QPS file, we use parseqps("filename.qps"). The output will be an object of type MPSDescription, which is the description of the following optimization problem as defined in filename.qps:

minimize    0.5*x'*Q*x + q₁'*x + q₂
subject to       A*x = b
            c₁ ≤ C*x ≤ c₂
            lb ≤  x  ≤ ub

To illustrate, let's assume that the QP Example given in Maros and Mészáros

NAME          QP example
ROWS
 N  obj
 G  r1
 L  r2
COLUMNS
    c1        r1                2.0    r2               -1.0
    c1        obj               1.5
    c2        r1                1.0    r2                2.0
    c2        obj              -2.0
RHS
    rhs1      obj              -4.0
    rhs1      r1                2.0    r2                6.0
RANGES
BOUNDS
UP  bnd1      c1               20.0
QUADOBJ
    c1        c1                8.0
    c1        c2                2.0
    c2        c2               10.0
ENDATA

is saved as filename.qps. Then,

julia> mps   = parseqps("test/QPExample.qps")
QP instance: QP example.
---
  minimize    0.5*x'*Q*x + q₁'*x + q₂
  subject to       A*x = b
              c₁ ≤ C*x ≤ c₂
              lb ≤  x  ≤ ub
---

For more information on the function, type ?parseqps in Julia.

Accessing the Fields

There are convenient getter functions defined for the MPSDescription objects.

For instance, to get the name and variables of the given problem, we can write

julia> name(mps)
"QP example"

julia> variables(mps)
2-element Array{Symbol,1}:
 :c1
 :c2

Then, we can get the objective part of the example problem description above by typing

julia> Q, q₁, q₂ = objective(mps);

julia> Q
2×2 Array{Float64,2}:
 8.0   2.0
 2.0  10.0

julia> q₁
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
  1.5
 -2.0

julia> q₂
4.0

Similarly, to get the equalities and inequalities defined on the variables of the problem, we can write

julia> A, b = equalities(mps);

julia> A  # no equalities given in the example
0×2 Array{Float64,2}

julia> b  # no equalities given in the example
0-element Array{Float64,1}

julia> C, c₁, c₂ = inequalities(mps);

julia> C
2×2 Array{Float64,2}:
  2.0  1.0
 -1.0  2.0

julia> c₁
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
    2.0
 -Inf

julia> c₂
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
 Inf
   6.0

Finally, the lower and upper bounds defined on the variables of the problem can be obtained by

julia> lb, ub = bounds(mps);

julia> lb
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
 0.0
 0.0

julia> ub
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
  20.0
 Inf

Please note that, in MPSDescription objects, c₁, c₂, lb and ub can all contain infinite values.

Obtaining a Canonical Representation

Sometimes, it might be useful to obtain the following canonical representation of the same optimization problem defined above:

minimize    0.5*x'*Q*x + q₁'*x + q₂
subject to       A*x = b
                 C̃*x ≤ c̃
            lb ≤  x  ≤ ub

To achieve this, we can write canon = canonical(mps), which returns a CanonicalDescription object:

julia> canon = canonical(mps)
QP instance: QP example.
---
  minimize    0.5*x'*Q*x + q₁'*x + q₂
  subject to       A*x = b
                   C̃*x ≤ c̃
              lb ≤  x  ≤ ub
---

julia> name(canon);                   # same as `name(mps)`

julia> variables(canon);              # same as `variables(mps)`

julia> Q, q₁, q₂ = objective(canon);  # same as `objective(mps)`

julia> A, b = equalities(canon);      # same as `equalities(mps)`

julia> lb, ub = bounds(canon);        # same as `bounds(mps)`

julia> C̃, c̃ = inequalities(canon);

julia> C̃
2×2 Array{Float64,2}:
 -2.0  -1.0
 -1.0   2.0

julia> c̃
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
 -2.0
  6.0

Limitations

QPSParser,

  • does not guarantee that Q in the problem descriptions is positive semi-definite. Any user of the package has to check the definiteness of Q in their applications,
  • gives both MPSDescription and CanonicalDescription in dense format. In other words, all the matrices and vectors involved in the descriptions are dense matrices and vectors. This might be a limitation when dealing with large problems or using the package in low-memory platforms.

First Commit

10/10/2017

Last Touched

almost 2 years ago

Commits

20 commits

Requires:

Used By: